Site Selection

  • Why you should have a safety plan in place for your next meeting

    When meeting planners think of forming a contingency or safety plan for their next meeting, they usually feel overwhelmed. Industry experts say meeting planners who ask at the right questions and do the proper research should be able to put together a plan with ease. Remember, it’s vital for every meeting or event to have a safety plan in place!

  • How to minimize your guestroom block attrition damages

    The meetings and events industry has seen a lot of changes over the past decade. As an event organizer, you will have witnessed an increased complexity in the hotel contracts you negotiate. You are now faced with the inclusion of minimum performance guarantees which come in the form of food and beverage minimums, sliding scales, cancellation policies and guestroom block attrition.

  • Determining your meeting requirements

    One of the best ways to figure out your requirements is to develop a preliminary schedule. The schedule should be a general outline of what will happen and approximately when. The following list of considerations will help you think through these things.

  • Selecting a unique venue

    “Selecting a unique venue tells attendees that the message being relayed is important and you want it to register,” says Jonathan Fruitman, director of marketing and venue guru for EventSource. “It communicates that the meeting isn’t a waste of the delegates time, or being held simply because ‘it’s that time of year’, but rather speaks volumes about the company hosting it, in essence saying ‘we’re different, we’re fun and we’re dynamic.’”

  • Types of meeting room

    Just as different locations suit different types of meetings, so does the type of room a meeting is hosted in, and how that room is set up. The U.S.-based Fine Speakers Bureau offers these distinctions between different room set-ups, and what types of meetings they best apply to.

  • Checking off site inspection concerns

    A site inspection is a critical part of event planning and audiovisual design. Armed with pen, paper and a digital camera, you are prepared for your site inspection.

  • A full house

    Picture yourself with options as to where you should hold your next meeting or event; you have in front of you a brochure for a great facility in a major downtown city in Canada, it’s a hotel that offers a fairly large space for your attending delegates, good food, and reasonable prices for their rooms; now look at the brochure beside it for a casino in a major city in Canada.

Venue & Supplier Profiles